Gavilgad: the fort of Gavilgad took its name from the pastoral Gavlis centuries ago. They have deserted the fort. now. There are no inhabitants save the occasional visits of a panther or two and the herds of cattle who come to drink water from the tanks which once supplied water to a stately court and a strong garrison. Even to-day two tanks are in good condition but they are heavily silted and there is an abundance of shrub growth inside them which has rendered the waters putrid and useless for drinking. The tanks are known as Devatalav and Khantalav. In the monsoon the water overflows in a torrent down the precipitous hill side. The durbar steps on which princes had held audience are a favourite resort for picnic from Cikhaldara in the hot weather, the great banyan tree which has spread its boughs across them affording a delightful shade; while another class of sightseers has scribbled its names on the walls of the lesser mosque. The Archaeological department has concluded that it is impossible to do anything to restore the ruins; and though money is spent from time to time in removing rank vegetation from the walls, they are bound, as years pass by, to lapse into greater decay.